Volleyball Drills You Can Do Alone

Volleyball is a team sport. It requires the effort and support of everyone on the team in order to be successful. To this end, most volleyball drills are designed for the team to work together on. However, much like any other sport out there, the more an individual can practice, the more they will bring to the team as a whole. Because most players don’t live with each other, it is important to work on a set of volleyball drills that a player can work on when alone. These are drills that can be done between practices or even in the off season. While they are generally beginning drills, they will help even advanced players stay sharp the year round.

One of the skills taught be volleyball drills is accuracy. A good solo drill you can work on is simply standing in front of a wall and hitting a certain spot on the wall. This sounds simple enough, but in practice there is much more to it than this. The player will pick a spot on the wall and aim to hit it. They will want to work on perfect form to get the most out of this drill. While a simple exercise, the wall-hitting is one of those very versatile volleyball drills that a player can do alone. They can work on spiking, serving, and even setting. Each type of hit will present the player with a set of challenges that ensure the ball travels to the spot they have chosen.

Before leaving the wall behind, your players can use the wall for other volleyball drills too. The wall-block is a very good drill that can be accomplished solo. The object of this drill is to start in a blocking position, jump and “block” the wall at a spot that is higher than the height of the net, and land in the block position again. Players should change the height and angle of the spot they hit in order to remain flexible. One of the best parts of this drill is that it teaches your players how to block a ball without causing a net foul. If your player isn’t careful performing this drill, they will scrape their arms and elbows on the wall. Since this would equate to the net in a real situation, you will find that your players learn very quickly the correct form to use when blocking. That means that they will drag their arms across the net a lot less.

Volleyball drills for passing and setting are a staple in any coach’s repertoire. Unfortunately, most drills require at least two people in order to pass the ball back and forth. A player can work on this alone, however. The player should toss the ball up in the air and bump it back up with both arms. Then they can rotate hits, switching to individual hands, setting the ball, and even using their forehead. This will teach total and complete ball control for them. The object is to keep the ball in the air for as long as possible using only legal moves to do so. Just the ball control learned from this is worth the time invested in teaching this drill.

It is important for your players, as well as coaches, to learn that they can work on some volleyball drills on their own. The more that a player drills, the better their performance will be. A team is made up of the sum of each player’s individual performance. Using solo volleyball drills will also show the team that a player feels the sport, therefore the team, is important enough to put in a little extra effort. The effort will pay off for the team as a whole when it comes to game time.